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HOW TO REGISTER A DBA OR ASSUMED BUSINESS NAME IN MICHIGAN

A “doing business as” (DBA), called an Assumed Name in Michigan, is a name that a business uses in practice that differs from its official registered name. For example, if you registered your business with the Secretary of State as “Katie’s Lawyer Services, LLC”, but you operate your business as “Awesome Lawyers”. “Awesome Lawyers” would be the Assumed Name of “Katie’s Lawyer Services, LLC”.


How to register an Assumed Business Name in MI

In the state of Michigan how to register an Assumed Business Name (DBAs) depends on the type of entity registering it.


Corporations, LLCs, and Limited Partnerships: Corporations, LLCs, and Limited Partnerships must fill out a Certificate of Assumed Name and file it with the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs Corporations, Securities & Commercial Licensing Bureau. The fee is $10.00 for Corporations and Limited Partnerships and $25.00 for LLCs. You may also file online here.


Sole Proprietorships: If the business operates under a name other than the individual's name, a "Certificate of Persons Conducting Business Under Assumed Name" must be filed with the county clerk in every county in which business is transacted. The certificate must include all of the following information:


- Name under which the sole proprietorship will transact business in the county.

- Name and business or residence address of the owner.

- The county or state where business was organized, if not organized in that county.

- Nature of the entity.


If you are doing business in more than one county, you would need to file this information in each county where you originally filed.


General Partnership: When forming a copartnership a "Certificate of Copartnership" or a "Certificate of Persons Conducting Business Under Assumed Name" must be filed with the county clerk in all the counties in which the business is to be conducted. The Certificate of Copartnership must include all the following information:


- Name under which the copartnership will transact business in the county.

- The term of the copartnership.

- Name and business or residence address of the partners.

- Nature of the entity.


If you are doing business in more than one county, you would need to file this information in each county where you originally filed.


To determine how to file in your specific county visit your county’s website or please contact O’Neill Tran Law today at info@oneilltranlaw.com for additional information.


While this article strives to provide general information on filing DBAs in Michigan, this article does not contain legal advice and I highly recommend that you speak with your business attorney for further guidance.


For more information on whether your business needs a DBA please see What is a DBA and does my business need one? or contact O’Neill Tran Law at info@oneilltranlaw.com.

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O’Neill Tran Law assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or timeliness of the information on this website.  This website is for informational purposes only and is not legal advice nor a substitute for legal counsel.  The use of this website does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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